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The Top 10 Rules Of Kickball

Table of Contents


What is kickball?

While you may think of kickball as a fun playground activity for kids, you can still play competitive kickball. Kickball is simple to learn if you don't know the rules, and you can get started playing kickball with little to no cost. Equipment is easy to come by, all you need is a rubber ball or soccer ball to play. Kickball is basically baseball, but instead of hitting a baseball with a baseball bat, you kick a bouncy rubber ball. You will see many similarities between the two sports, and understanding baseball will make understanding kickball much easier. The game is played with 9 players on each team, and similar game structure to baseball. Teams take turns kicking and playing in the field, and the goal is to score more runs than your opponent. Most cities have amateur kickball leagues, so join a team in your area and get in on the fun!

What are the top 10 rules of kickball?

  1. Pitching
  2. Kicking
  3. Base Running
  4. Catching and Fielding
  5. Scoring
  6. Game Structure
  7. Fair and Foul Kicks
  8. Outs
  9. Fielding Positions
  10. Equipment

1. Pitching

When you think of pitching, you might think of baseball. However, the goal of a pitcher in kickball is very different than the goal of a baseball pitcher. Since there is no such thing as a strikeout in kickball, you want to give the kicker a pitch that he or she can kick. Pitching in baseball is a very intense and difficult thing to do, but in kickball it is quite simple. You roll or bounce the ball toward the kicker, who will then attempt to kick the ball. You must be either on or behind the pitching mound when you roll the ball towards home plate, and you should aim for the kickers dominant foot.

2. Kicking

When you are kicking, you should try to kick the ball to an area where there are no fielders.

You need to be in the kicker's box, meaning that you must stay behind home plate until you kick the ball. When the pitcher rolls the ball toward you, you should try and kick the ball. After you kick the ball, you need to run to first base as fast as you can. Your goal is to get on base, and to avoid getting an out. This means that either a fielder catches the ball when you kick it or the fielders throw the ball to the base you are going to. The best kickers can kick the ball very accurately and very far, making it hard for the defense to get them out.

3. Base Running

If you know how baserunning works in baseball, then you know how baserunning works in kickball. To score a run, you must advance to first base, then second base, then third place, then home plate. When you run the bases, you must stay within the baseline. Once you get on base, there are a couple rules you should know about. You cannot lead off like you can in baseball, and you can get tagged out by having the ball thrown at you. You must be aware of who has the ball when you are running, so you don't get tagged out. You are safe from getting tagged out if you are touching any one of the four bases, and if you are not, you are fair game to be out. There are also force outs, which you will learn more about in a later lesson.

4. Catching and Fielding

Catching and fielding is all about getting three outs. Once you get three outs the two teams switch sides, meaning the offense can't score any more runs. There are a couple ways you can get an out in kickball. The first is to catch a fly ball, meaning the kicker kicks the ball in the air and you catch it without letting it bounce on the ground. You can also throw the runner out at first, just like in baseball. The one area where kickball differs from baseball is pegging. You can peg base runners with the ball and get them out, as long as they are not touching a base.

5. Scoring

The goal of kickball is to score more runs than your opponent. Scoring works the same way it does in baseball, where runners have to cross home plate to score. You can score any time your team is on offense and you have less than three outs. If you are on base, and the kicker kicks the ball, you should try and advance to the next base if possible. If you can, try and make it to home plate because this will give your team a run. The team with the most runs at the end of a game wins.

6. Game Structure

As with most of the rules for kickball, they align very closely with baseball's rules. The way each game plays out is identical to baseball, with each team taking turns kicking and fielding during innings. There are 9 innings in a game, meaning each team will get 9 chances to kick, the home team kicking second. During each inning, both teams will get 3 outs to try to score as many runs as they can. If a home team is winning at the end of the game, there is no need to play the second half of the 9th inning, so the game just ends.

7. Fair and Foul Kicks

Every kick in kickball is either fair or foul. If a ball lands in the green areas on the picture below, it is a fair ball. If the ball lands in the blue area, then it is a foul ball. If the ball rolls from the green area to the blue area before 1st or 3rd base, then it is foul. However, if the ball rolls from the green area to the blue area after 1st or 3rd base, then it is a fair ball. A fair ball is in play, meaning you will either be out or get on base. A foul ball results in a do over, and will add 1 strike to the count.

8. Outs

When you are fielding in kickball, the goal is to get any player who kicks the ball out. On the contrary, kickers have the opposite goal. Each inning consists of two half innings, where each team gets a turn to kick, and each of these half innings lasts until the team kicking gets three outs. These outs can come in any form, whether it be a strikeout, a popout, a ground out, or a peg. As a kicker, there are a couple ways to avoid getting out. For example, you should try not to kick the ball too high, or fielders will catch it. Aim for line drives, meaning kick the ball hard but low in order to avoid popping out.

9. Fielding Positions

The fielding positions for kickball are generally the same as baseball, but can be much more fluid and can change depending on who is kicking. The pitcher stands on the pitching mound and rolls the ball to the kicker. There is a catcher who stands behind the kicker who covers home plate and shags balls that roll past the kicker. The first baseman and third baseman stand on their respective bases, and the second baseman stands to the right of second base and the shortstop stands to the left of second base. There are three outfielders, a right, left, and center fielder. However, no one's position is set in stone and fielders can move around if they please. For example, if there is a kicker known to kick the ball far, one of the infielders might drop into the outfield for some extra coverage, and vice versa.

10. Equipment

Kickball equipment is very simple. All you need to play is a baseball or softball field and a rubber bouncy ball, which you can easily find for cheap prices. If you don't have access to a field, you can place down your own bases, which are also cheap. Other equipment includes athletic shoes and athletic clothing. You may also need sunglasses, because it makes it easier to catch the ball in the field.

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