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What Is Tripping In Hockey?

Ice Hockey Tripping

Tripping occurs when a player places their hand, elbow, leg, knee, foot, or stick in front of an opposing player so that they may fall or lose their balance as a result.

This is considered to be a separate action from clipping, leg checking, and slew footing, but is penalized the same. Intentional and accidental trips are different, and they are penalized in different ways.

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Tripping Penalties

Tripping is typically a minor penalty. The referee may use discretion to make the penalty major if the actions are more extreme. A major and game misconduct penalty can be enforced if the opposing player is harmed or injured as a result of the action.

There are a few instances where the referee can make a more prominent judgement call on the play. If an accidental trip occurs upon completion of a play, the player may not be penalized. If an accidental trip occurs upon or after the stoppage of a play, there may be no penalty given. If a player makes contact with a puck and then subsequently trips an opposing player, it may be ruled accidental and no penalty will be given.

FAQ

Is tripping allowed in hockey?

Tripping is the action of placing your hand, elbow, leg, knee, foot, or stick in front of an opposing player so that they may fall or lose their balance as a result. This action is not permitted in hockey games. Penalties will likely be called for intentional tripping, but the referee is given the opportunity to make a judgement call on what appears to be accidental tripping. More often than not, accidental tripping will not be penalized.

Is it tripping if you hit the puck first?

Tripping occurs when a player places their hand, elbow, leg, knee, foot, or stick in front of an opposing player so that they may fall or lose their balance as a result. If this action takes place as a result of a player hitting the puck, there may not be penalization. Specifically, if a player makes contact with the puck first and then subsequently trips an opposing player as a result of their contact, the player will not receive a penalty.

What is a leg check in hockey?

Leg checking occurs when a player extends their leg in front of or behind an opposing player with the intention of making that player trip or lose balance. This is considered to be a separate action from clipping, leg checking, and slew footing, but is penalized the same. Minor penalties are typically enforced, but major or game misconduct penalties can be given depending on the severity of the incident.

What is the penalty for tripping in hockey?

Tripping is often ruled as a minor penalty. This means that a player would be required to sit in the penalty box for a full 2 minutes before being allowed to return to the ice. If the penalty is severe, the player will receive a major infraction and go to the penalty box for 5 minutes. Sometimes tripping is accidental, in which case no penalty would be given to the player.



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