Tim Thomas In Hockey

Who is tim thomas in hockey?

Tim Thomas is a former goaltender for the Boston Bruins and a two-time winner of the Vezina Trophy (a distinction awarded annually to the top goaltender in the NHL) as the top goaltender in the NHL. In 2011, at the age of 37, he became the oldest player and the first American-born goaltender to have been named a Stanley Cup MVP.

In 1993, Thomas was recruited as the goaltender for the University of Vermont, where he made an astounding 3950 career saves (the second highest in NCAA Division I hockey history) and led the nation with his 0.924 save percentage. Upon graduation, Thomas then went on to successfully play in the American Hockey League and the Finnish Elite League for seven years.

In 2005, Thomas took over as the starting goaltender for the Boston Bruins, eventually becoming the first goaltender in team history to have been awarded the 7th Player Award twice.

In 2011, he set an all-time record for the most saves in a single postseason (798) and in a Stanley Cup series (238), as well as a save percentage of 0.967 in the Stanley Cup Finals. Furthermore, Thomas also became the first goaltender in the NHL to win three consecutive All-Star Games.

Thomas is also well-known for successfully adopting a yoga-based physical condition program to increase his strength and flexibility, a regiment which has since been embraced by many other players around the world.

In 2011, Thomas set an all-time record for the most saves in a single postseason (798) and in a Stanley Cup series (238), as well as an unheard-of save percentage of 0.967 in the Stanley Cup Finals. Furthermore, in 2012, Thomas went on to become the first goaltender in the NHL to win four consecutive back-to-back All-Star Games.

During the entirety of his 12-year NHL career, Thomas posted an astounding 0.920 career save percentage, blocking 11,795 out of 12,822 shots on goal, and amassed a total of 31 shutouts.


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