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List of Hockey Statistics

List of Ice Hockey Statistics

In hockey, there are many statistics that are used to track how well a player or team is playing. A lot of these statistics are unique to hockey which makes understanding them harder for a fan that wants to learn more about the game. Learn more about all of them and what they mean here!


General Statistics

  • FO%: Faceoff percentage is the number of faceoffs a center has won divided by the number of faceoffs they have taken. The best centers in the National Hockey League usually win around 55% of the faceoffs that they take.
  • GP: Games played in hockey keeps track of how many games during a season a player sees action in. For a player to record an official game played they need to step foot on the ice or serve a penalty.
  • L: The number of games lost by a goaltender or team. When a team loses a game, they are awarded zero points in the standings.
  • OTL: Overtime losses in hockey refer to games that a team loses after regulation has ended. This means that the game ends in a tie and needs extra time to decide a winner. These games can end in either overtime or a shootout if overtime also ends in a tie. When a team records an overtime loss, they are rewarded with one point in the standings.
  • PIM: Penalty minutes are the total amount of time that a player spends in the penalty box for committing an infraction. This time could be the result of a major penalty, minor penalty, or a game misconduct.
  • T.O.I: Time on ice in hockey is a statistic that records how many minutes and seconds a player records on the ice. This statistic is important because many shifts in hockey last one minute or less.
  • W: The number of games won by a goaltender or team. Wins are not tracked for individual players as they are only on the ice for one third of the game at most. For teams, a win means two points in the standings.
  • +/-: Plus-Minus rating in hockey tells how many times a player has been on the ice for his teams goals and the others teams goals. A player is awarded a plus when they are currently recording time on ice and their team scores a goal. On the other hand, if a player is on the ice and the other team scores, they are awarded a minus. These two numbers are put together to get a player's Plus-Minus rating.

Offensive Statistics

  • A: Assists in hockey are awarded to the last two players on the offensive team that touch the puck before the goal scorer. The person who touches it second to last is given a secondary assist while the person who passes it directly to the goal scorer is given a primary assist.
  • ENG: Empty-net goals are goals that are scored when the other team has pulled their goalie for an extra attacker in an effort to tie that game when they are losing late. These goals usually put the game out of reach, effectively ending the game.
  • G: Goals in hockey are awarded to the player on the offensive team who last touches the puck before it goes into the net. These players are still awarded a goal if the puck deflects off of a defensive player and goes into the net.
  • GWG: Game-winning goals are goals that are scored that give a team a one goal lead. These can be scored during regulation or overtime. They can also be scored early in the game as they are the goal that made the team have more than the other no matter what the score is at the time.
  • OTG: Overtime goals are goals that are scored in the extra period of a hockey game. Games go to overtime if they are tied after the full sixty minutes. Overtime goals end the game and it is declared a victory for the team that scored.
  • PPG: Power play goals are goals that are scored while a team is playing with one extra skater than the other team. This is due to the other team committing a penalty and one of their players having to serve time in the penalty box.
  • PPTOI: Power play time on ice is the amount of time that a player spends in play while their team has one more player than the other team. This time is usually reserved for the best offensive players as it is one of the best opportunities in the game to score a goal.
  • PTS: Points in hockey are a combination of goals and assists that a player records. A point is given for both the primary and secondary assists on a goal.
  • S%: Shooting percentage in hockey is a statistic that tracks how many goals a player scores based on the number of shots that they take. It is found by dividing the number of goals a player records by the number of shots they take.
  • SOG: Shots on goal in hockey track how many times a player puts the puck on net requiring a goalie to make a save. Shots on goal are not recorded if the puck misses the net or if a shot is blocked by a defending player.
  • SHG: Shorthanded goals are goals that are scored while a team is playing with one less skater than the other team. This is due to the other team committing a penalty and one of their players having to serve time in the penalty box.

Defensive Statistics

  • GAA: Goals against average in hockey is a statistic that tracks how many goals a goalie lets in on average per sixty minutes played. This does not account for empty net goals.
  • SHTOI: Shorthanded time on ice is the amount of time that a player spends in play while their team has one less player on the ice than the other team. This time is usually reserved for the best defensive players as the other team will have their best offensive players on the ice.
  • SO: Shutouts in hockey track the number of games that a goalie plays where they don't allow a single goal to be scored. These games also count as wins for a goalie.
  • SV%: Save percentage in hockey is a statistic that shows what percentage of shots on goal a goalie saves. This percentage tells how reliable a goalie is and if they should be trusted to save a large amount of the opposing team's shots.