Hockey Foul From Behind on a Breakaway

Ice Hockey Foul From Behind

In hockey, when a player is fouled from behind on a breakaway, they are prevented from scoring in open ice due to an opponent’s foul. With this foul coming from behind, it will also be out of the player’s line of vision. A penalty shot is assessed in this situation in order to compensate for the lost scoring opportunity.


Definition

When a player is fouled from behind on a breakaway in hockey, a situation has occurred in which that player is deprived of an obvious opportunity to score. A penalty shot is then awarded to that player in an attempt to restore the lost scoring opportunity.

In order for the penalty shot to be awarded, several conditions must be met. Firstly, the player must be on a breakaway, which means they are: in control of the puck, advancing toward the opposing goal, and past their defensive blue line with no other opponents between them and the opposing goalkeeper. The foul must come from behind or diagonally to the rear, outside of the player’s peripheral vision. Also, the foul must clearly deprive the player of a scoring opportunity through its action.

Several types of fouls may be called from behind on a breakaway, including high-sticking, cross-checking, slashing, hooking, holding, and tripping. If the penalty for the type of foul is a minor penalty when not committed from behind on a breakaway, then the offender will not be forced to serve a time penalty in addition to the awarded penalty shot. However, if the type of foul is a double-minor penalty, major penalty, or match penalty, then the offender will be forced to serve a time penalty in addition to the penalty shot being awarded. An exception to this consequence is if the goalkeeper has been taken off the ice, and a player is fouled from behind on a breakaway while attempting to score on the open net goal. In this situation, a goal will be awarded instead of a penalty shot.

Result

The result of a player fouling an opponent from behind on a breakaway is an immediate stoppage in play, followed by the player whom the foul was committed against being awarded a penalty shot. All other players move to the side of the ice, and the player taking the penalty shot is given the puck at the center face-off spot. Then the player is allowed to skate toward the opposing goalkeeper and take a shot, attempting to score a goal. This result is the same in amateur and professional leagues. A goal will be awarded instead of a penalty shot if the foul is committed during a breakaway on an open net.

Referee Signal

Ice Hockey Foul From Behind Referee Signal

The referee will stop play with their whistle in the event a player is fouled from behind on a breakaway. The referee will make the signal specific to the type of foul that was committed. These fouls include holding, hooking, high sticking, slashing, tripping, and cross-checking. Next, the referee will fully extend the arm of their non-whistle hand, pointing toward the center ice face-off spot, to signal that a penalty shot is the result of the foul.

Examples

  • A player is tripped from behind while past their own defensive blue line, with a clear shot at the goal and no opponents between them and the goalkeeper. The player has been fouled from behind on a breakaway.
  • A skater nearing their opponent’s goal is about to shoot the puck and attempt to score a goal. That skater is cross-checked diagonally from the rear. This is a foul from behind on a breakaway.
  • With the goalkeeper off the ice and no other skaters around, a player about to shoot a goal is slashed from behind and prevented from scoring. The player has been fouled from behind on a breakaway.

Similar Violations to Foul From Behind on a Breakaway

  • Cross-Checking
  • Holding
  • Hooking
  • High-Sticking
  • Slashing
  • Tripping

FAQ

What is a foul from behind on a breakaway?

A foul from behind on a breakaway play can consist of various penalty offenses, such as tripping, hooking, slashing, or tripping, among others. The fouled player must also be on a breakaway, which is when they are advancing down the ice, have passed their own defensive blue line, and have no other opponents between them and the opposing goalkeeper. A foul from behind on a breakaway results in an automatically awarded penalty shot in hockey. This penalty shot will be awarded if the player is in control of the puck and has a clear shot at the goal.

What are the consequences of being called for fouling from behind on a breakaway in hockey?

The consequences of being called for fouling from behind on a breakaway in hockey are a stoppage in play and a penalty shot being awarded to your opponent. This gives the opposing team an unopposed shot against the goalkeeper to make up for the scoring opportunity taken away by committing the foul. If the foul results in a major penalty or match penalty, you will still have to serve the resulting time penalty, in addition to the penalty shot being awarded.

What are the criteria for a penalty shot when a player is fouled from behind on a breakaway?

There are four criteria, all of which must be met, for a penalty shot to be awarded when a player is fouled from behind on a breakaway. First, the skater must have advanced beyond their defensive blue line. Second, the foul must be committed from behind or diagonally to the rear. Third, the player must have a clear opportunity to score and have control of the puck. Fourth and finally, there must be no opponents between the fouled player and the opposing goalkeeper.