Hockey Attempt to Injure Penalty

Ice Hockey Attempt to Injure Penalty

An attempt to injure penalty is a match penalty that is issued for especially deliberate and severe physical offenses against another player. It might include checks to the head, ripping off an opponent's helmet, or purposefully tripping an opponent. An attempt to injure penalty results in a player's ejection from the game and possible suspension, depending on the severity of the case.


Definition

An attempt to injure penalty is issued when a player has shown a clear and deliberate attempt to harm another player. It is a match penalty, meaning it results in a player's ejection from the game and possible prolonged suspension depending upon the severity of the case and the history of the player. Typically, this means the team of the ejected player must play short-handed for 5 minutes. An attempt to injure penalty is issued based on intent, regardless of whether or not the attempt results in actual harm to the other player.

Historically, hockey has been a fairly rough and physical sport, but match penalties are reserved for instances with especially severe or unreciprocated roughness. To qualify as a match penalty rather than a lesser misconduct penalty, officials have to review a player's actions and find it to have clearly malicious intent or reckless endangerment. Unlike the far more common misconduct penalty, which results in time in the penalty box, a match penalty results in sending the offending player to the dressing room for the rest of the game, as well as a possible review by authorities of the league.

Instances resulting in an attempt to injure penalty might include a violent check to the head, roughly boarding another player, or punching an unsuspecting opponent or team official. An attempt to injure penalty can be differentiated from a fighting penalty, as a fighting penalty is issued when players are mutually trading blows, while an attempt to injure mainly has one clear and excessively forceful aggressor.

Result

Attempting to harm another player is considered one of the worst offenses across professional, minor, semi-pro, and junior leagues alike and is treated with stern consequences. It universally results in a match penalty and a player's ejection from the game across all leagues, as well as reviews from respective authorities in severe cases. Across the NHL and most leagues, it goes down as ten penalty minutes added to a player's statistics, while the IIHF adds 25 minutes.

Penalty Signal

Ice Hockey Attempt to Injure Penalty Signal

A referee will use the match penalty signal when they have discerned a player has deliberately attempted to injure another player. To signal an attempt to injure penalty, the ref will pat the top of their head with one flat hand while the other arm is held down and at the side. A match penalty sign is sometimes used in tandem with signals that further specify the offending action, such as boarding, tripping, or elbowing.

Examples

  • A goalie yanks the facemask of an opposing player while attempting to block a shot.
  • A forward roughly boards a defensive player on the opposing team.
  • One player blindsides another with a violent check to the head.
  • A player punches a team official of the opposite team.

Similar Penalties To Hockey Attempt to Injure

FAQ

What is an attempt to injure penalty in hockey?

An attempt to injure penalty occurs when a player deliberately attempts to harm or endanger another player or team official. It qualifies as a match penalty and results in the player's ejection from the game, in addition to possible prolonged suspension depending on the severity of the case. A standalone case also counts as ten added penalty minutes in player statistics. Cases are reviewed extensively by officials to determine clear intent and judge the severity of the case. Even in cases where the other player is not harmed, the penalty is still issued due to intent.

What are the consequences of an attempt to injure penalty in hockey?

An attempt to injure penalty results in stern consequences both in the game and potentially for an individual player's career. After review, it immediately results in a player's ejection and perhaps suspension from further games while also going in the books as ten penalty minutes for a player's statistics. In the NHL and pro leagues, a player's ejection due to an attempt to injure means playing short-handed for five minutes, with the exception of the team already being short-handed by two players. A repeated history of offenses or especially severe cases in regards to this penalty can result in a prolonged suspension from the league.

Do you get an attempt to injure penalty for fighting in hockey?

Fighting in hockey is differentiated from and treated more leniently than an attempt to injure penalty. Fighting is defined as two or more players mutually trading blows, while an attempt to injure is discerned when an offending player attempts to harm a player or official who is unsuspecting or unwilling to fight. When players are penalized for fighting, they receive a misconduct and major penalty rather than a match penalty. However, a player will be subject to a prolonged suspension and potentially a formal review by authorities if they are found guilty of fighting with the same team or player repeatedly in a season.