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  1. golf
  2. rules
  3. scoring

Golf Scoring Rules

Table of Contents


Golf Scoring Rules

In this chapter, we will learn how scoring works in the game of golf. By the end of this chapter you will know the types of scores and how to keep track of strokes in a golf game.


What we'll be learning.

First, we will learn about the different kinds of scores a golfer can make on a hole.

Then, we'll discuss the different methods of keeping score.

  • Stroke Play
  • Match Play
  • Scramble
  • Bestball
  • Bestball Matchplay
  • Shamble

Golf Scoring Lingo

Here are all the terms we will be covering related to golf scoring:


Par

First, we will learn about the different kinds of scores a golfer can make on a hole.

Par is the expected number of strokes the golf course expects a golfer to use to complete the hole. When a golfer scores a par, he is even for that hole. A golf hole can be a Par 3, Par 4 or Par 5.


Birdie

Birdie is when a golfer uses one fewer strokes than par to complete a hole. For example, if a golfer completes a par 4 in three strokes, then he has made a birdie.


Eagle

An eagle is when a golfer uses two fewer strokes than par to complete a hole. For example, if a golfer completes a par 5 in 3 strokes, then he has made an eagle.


Albatross

An albatross is when a golfer uses three fewer strokes than par to complete a hole. For example, if a golfer completes a par 5 in two strokes, then he has made an albatross, an incredibly rare feat in the game of golf. Another word for an albatross is a double eagle.


Bogey

A bogey is when a golfer uses one more stroke than par to complete a hole. For example, if a golfer completes a par 4 in five strokes, then he has made a bogey.


Double Bogey

A bogey is when a golfer uses two more strokes than par to complete a hole. For example, if a golfer completes a par 4 in 6 strokes, then he had made a double bogey.


Triple Bogey

A bogey is when a golfer uses three more strokes than par to complete a hole. For example, if a golfer completes a par 4 in 7 strokes, then he had made a triple bogey.


Quadruple Bogey

A bogey is when a golfer uses four more strokes than par to complete a hole. For example, if a golfer completes a par 4 in 8 strokes, then he had made a quadruple bogey.


Hole in One

A hole in one occurs when a golfer hits a tee shot in the hole, thus only needing one stroke to complete the hole.


Ace

The term ace is another way of saying hole in one, which occurs when a golfer hits a tee shot in the hole, thus only needing one stroke to complete the hole.


Scoring Methods

Let's discuss the different formats for keeping score.

  • Stroke Play
  • Match Play
  • Scramble
  • Bestball
  • Bestball Matchplay
  • Shamble

Stroke Play

Stroke play is a method of keeping score by counting the number of strokes a golfer uses to complete a round of golf. Stroke play is the most common way of keeping score and indicates the golfer's score relative to par.


Match Play

Match play consists of two golfers playing each other based on holes won. For example, if golfer one shoots a lower score than golfer two on a hole, then golfer one is 1 up. Golfer two is 1 down. If both players tie on a hole then they are all squared.


Scramble

A scramble is a format where a group of golfers play the best shot from a teammate in order to collectively shoot a low score on the golf course. Unlike stroke or match play, a golfer does not play his own golf ball for the entirety of the round.


Bestball

Bestball is a format where a group of golfers each play their own ball for the entirety of a golf round and take the lowest score out of the group for each hole.


Bestball Matchplay

Bestball matchplay is a two versus two format, where each team takes its player's lowest score to go against an opposing team. The team with the player who shoots the lowest score goes 1 up on that hole.


Shamble

A shamble is a modified version of a scramble, but instead only uses the best drive of the group, and then each player is forced to play his own ball through the completion of the hole.



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