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Golf Hybrids

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Golf Hybrids, Utilities, and Rescue Clubs

Hybrids, utilities, and rescue clubs are all the same thing.

They are golf clubs designed like a wood and an iron. Due to its thin crown, the hybrid is easier to hit for shots in the rough as it glides through the grass more smoothly compares to a long iron.

These clubs are helpful for golfers of all skill levels.

Golfers oftentimes use hybrids instead of long irons because they are easier to hit and propel the ball in the air with greater ease than a long iron. Hybrids are also easy to hit out of the rough compared to a long iron, but can also be played from the tee box and the fairway. Golfers may use a hybrid to chip the ball from off the green as well since it sends the ball rolling at a low angle, which makes the hybrid an excellent option for hitting a bump and run shot.


Types of Hybrids

There are three main types of hybrids

  • Hybrid
  • 3-Hybrid
  • 4-Hybrid

Hybrid

A hybrid, also known as a utility or rescue club, is a golf club that is designed like a wood and an iron. A hybrid club is useful out of the rough and is generally easier to hit than a long iron.


3-Hybrid

A 3-hybrid is comparable to a 3-iron, and can be used on tee shots, long approach shots, and chip shots around the green. The 3-Hybrid normally has 19 degrees of loft.


4-Hybrid

A 3-hybrid is comparable to a 4-iron, and can be used on tee shots, long approach shots, and chip shots around the green. The 3-Hybrid normally has 21 degrees of loft.



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