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  1. golf
  2. rules
  3. hazards

Golf Hazards

Table of Contents


Golf Hazard Types

Next, we will learn about the different types of hazards you might find on the golf course.

There are four types of hazards on a golf course. As a player or viewer, you will learn what hazards are and the rules to follow when your golf ball end up in a hazard.

  • Fairway Bunker
  • Greenside Bunker
  • Water Hazard
  • Out of Bound

Fairway Bunker

A bunker is an area of sand that can be located throughout a golf hole. When addressing the golf ball, the player cannot let the club touch the sand or else they receive a penalty. A fairway bunker is an area of sand located just off the fairway.


Greenside Bunker

A bunker is an area of sand that can be located throughout a golf hole. When addressing the golf ball, the player cannot let the club touch the sand or else they receive a penalty. A greenside bunker is an area of sand located around the putting green.


Water Hazard

A water hazard is an area of water that can be found throughout a golf course. If a golfer hits the ball in a water hazard, they will have to add one stroke to their score on the hole. Check out Golf Hazards to view the rules of playing your next shot after hitting the ball into a water hazard.


Out of Bounds

Out of bounds is a marked area that is not considered part of the golf course. Out of bounds is normally marked by white stakes that are in the ground. Go to Golf Out of Bounds, to see the rule on what to do when a golfer hits the ball out of bounds.


Golf Hazard Penalties

Since we have learned the different types of hazards, we must now understand the penalty associated with hitting a golf ball into a hazard.

  • One Stroke Penalty
  • Grounding Club in Hazard
  • Practice Swing in Hazard

One Stroke Penalty

A one stroke penalty means a golfer must add one additional stroke to his score on a hole if the golfer is forced to drop a ball at the nearest point of relief after hitting the ball into a hazard.


Grounding Club in Hazard

A golfer cannot ground the golfer club when attempting to hit a ball out of a hazard. This means that the head of the golf club cannot rest on the surface of the hazard. Rather, the club must hover above the water or ground at address. Grounding a club in a hazard incurs a one-stroke penalty.


Practice Swing in Hazard

A golfer can make a practice swing in a hazard as long as the golf club does not make contact with the surface. Otherwise, the golfer will incur a one-stroke penalty.



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