Football American Football Conference (AFC)

What is the American Football Conference (AFC)?

The American Football Conference represents one half of the NFL, and is comprised of the AFC East, AFC North, AFC South, and AFC West. The AFC used to just be known as the American Football League before the AFL/NFL merger, but switched names in 1970.

There were originally 10 teams in the AFC, but the former NFL sent three of their teams, the Cleveland Browns, Pittsburgh Steelers, and Baltimore Colts to even the conference at 13. Three expansion teams joined the ranks, the Jacksonville Jaguars, Houston Texans, and Cleveland Browns. The Browns are still considered an expansion team because their original franchise moved to Baltimore.

The schedule for each AFC team is made of 75% conference games. Each team plays their division rivals twice and plays every team in another division from the AFC. Their final two conference games are against the two teams in the two AFC divisions remaining who were equal in positional standing in their respective division the previous year.

The AFC has been slightly less successful than their NFC counterparts, totaling 24 Super Bowl Trophies compared to 25.

The winner of the AFC conference championship receives the Lamar Hunt trophy. The New England Patriots have the most championships in the conference with eleven.

The Browns, Texans, and Jaguars have never appeared in a Super Bowl.

List of AFC Teams

AFC East

AFC North

AFC South

AFC West

Football American Football Conference