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Fantasy Football Flex Position

What is flex position in fantasy football? Get ready to learn what it means to use flex position when playing FF.

Introduction

What is the 'flex' player? The flex position is a very important one in fantasy football and can turn the tides week to week. Let's investigate further.

In this tutorial, you'll learn about the flex player and their role in fantasy football.

Flex

The 'flex' position is a position in a fantasy football lineup that accepts any position, including quarterback, wide receiver, etc. The flex position is simply an extra space in the lineup for anything that you want. Did you manage to draft two knockout quarterbacks but only one can start? Put the other in the flex position and both quarterbacks will earn points for you!

Flex as a 'Hot Spot'

Some team owners use the flex position as 'hot spots' where they put player who are currently on a hot streak and they rely mainly on the rest of their team to score the majority of the fantasy points each week. For example, in Week One of the 2017 NFL season, rookie running back Kareem Hunt rushed for 148 yards against a veteran Patriots defense. No one knew if Hunt was going to be a star or not, but team owners added him to their fantasy teams. For security, you could keep your regular running back in his position and put Hunt in the flex position. If he performs well, great! If not, you have your standard running back still earning points!

Evolving Game

As the game of football continues to evolve into a more pass happy game, so to does fantasy football put more emphasis on the wide receiver and tight end position. In the past, the flex was normally used for a running back, particularly those with pass catching abilities. Nowadays, flex positions are usually filled by wide receivers and tight ends. Although there are only a few elite tight ends in the NFL, many of them rack up touchdowns, and being able to have a second spot for a tight end who might not catch for yards but rather touchdowns is a new strategy. Additionally, leagues that place a large emphasis on quarterback play typically will have at least a few teams use the flex spot as a second quarterback spot. However, some of these leagues will likely just have a second quarterback slot built in.

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