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List of Fencing Statistics

List of Fencing Statistics

Fencing is an Olympic sport that consists of two fencers using swords in order to hit the other in a certain target area. Electronic scoring devices are used to determine touches. There are three events within the sport: foil, epee, and sabre. All three of these events use different rules and tactics.


List of Fencing Statistics

  • Black card: A black card is the worst punishment a fencer can receive. The fencer is disqualified and excluded from competition after receiving this card. This offense is the most serious card compared to yellow and red cards. Some examples of behavior resulting in a black card are severe unsportsmanlike conduct and cheating.
  • Bout: A fencing competition between two people in its entirety. This is also sometimes referred to as a match or an assault.
  • Compound: A fencer using several moves to make an attack or counterattack.
  • Corps à corps: This occurs when the two fencers make physical contact which results in neither being able to be touched by the opposing fencer's sword. This is illegal to do intentionally, but often happens by accident.
  • Disengage: A move done by slipping the sword underneath the opponent's sword.
  • Double touch/simultaneous action: When two fencers touch each other with their swords at the same time. This is attempted to be fixed by the "right of way" rule. In epee competition, both fencers receive points if this occurs.
  • Engage: The opposite of disengage. Both fencers make contact blade to blade.
  • Fault: There are many penalties or faults that can be called against a fencer resulting in yellow, red or black cards.
  • Feint: A feint or fake attack is used in order to set up a real attack. The feinting attacker hopes the defending attacker will react in a certain way in order to set up another strike.
  • Fence: The word the referee uses to begin a match.
  • Fleche: A running or lunging type attack where the attacking fencer's lead foot goes forward and the back foot usually rises. This is illegal in sabre, but legal in foil and epee.
  • Halt: The word used by the referee in order to stop a match.
  • Hits: A hit results in a point scored. Hits occur when a fencer touches the opposing player with his/her blade in the target area. In sabre, the edge of the sword can be used. In epee and foil, only the tip of the blade can be used.
  • Octave: A form of parry. The eighth and final defensive position in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Parry: A defensive move that blocks the blade of an attacking player.
  • Prime: A form of parry. The first of the main eight defensive positions in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Quarte: A form of parry. The fourth defensive position in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Quinte: A form of parry. The fifth defensive position in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Red card: A card given to a fencer that commits a penalty. This is also called a penalty touch. The offending player receives a warning and the opposing player is also given a touch. This is the second most serious offense in fencing, in between a yellow card and black card.
  • Remise: The continuation of an attack after the attacker has missed or it has been stopped by a parry by the defender.
  • Right of way: This rule was made in attempt to fix double touch or simultaneous action (i.e. when two fencers make contact with each other at the same time). This rule is up to the discretion of the referee, who decides which fencer was on the offense first. The fencer who was decided to be attacking first will receive the hit or point. This rule exists in both foil and sabre, but not in epee.
  • Riposte: An attack done immediately after a defending fencer parries the attacker's move. The eight defensive positions in fencing (prime, seconde, tierce, quarte, quinte, sixte, septime and octave) are all usually followed by a riposte.
  • Seconde: A form of parry. The second of the eight major defensive positions in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Septime: A form of parry. The seventh and second to last defensive position in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Sixte: A form of parry. The sixth of the eight defensive positions in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Stop hit: A form of counterattack to catch the attacker. This is called a stop cut in sabre. In order for the fencer using a stop hit to be awarded the point, he/she must time it perfectly. If not, the attacker will likely be awarded the point or hit.
  • Target area: The area of an opponent's body that can be touched by the other player's blade in order to score points. In foil, the target area is limited to the body and can also be touched with the point of the blade. In sabre, the target area is anywhere above the waist and the side of the blade can be used. In epee, the target area is the entire body and only the point of the blade can be used to make a hit.
  • Tierce: A form of parry. The third defensive position in fencing. Often followed with a riposte.
  • Touches: The way to score a point in fencing. This can also be called a hit. In epee and foil, only the tip or point of the blade can be used to touch an opponent. In sabre, the edge of the blade can also be used. A touch can only occur in the target area, which differs between the three types of fencing. In order to win a fencing match, a player needs to get 15 touches resulting in points.
  • Yellow card: This is given to a player as a warning without any other disciplinary action. This card differs from that of a red card and black card as these cards are much more severe and come with corresponding penalties. Yellow cards are given on the first offense of a penalty. If the offense is then committed again after the first offense, a red card or black card is typically given.