Curling Statistics

What are statistics in curling?

The statistics in curling are both individual and team measures relating different aspects of a curling game. Some examples of curling statistics are: shooting percentage; ends for per game; ends against per game; points per game; points against per game; hammer efficiency; and force efficiency.

Curling Scoring Stats

There are two statistics related to the score of a curling game. They are:

  1. Points For per Game: the average number of points your team scores in a game.
  2. Points Against per Game: the average number of points your opponent scores in a game.

Curling Ends Stats

There are lots of stats in curling related to ends. There are stats to keep track of how many ends you win, lose, blank, and steal. These statistics are known as:

  1. Ends For per Game: the average number of ends your team wins (or scores) in a game.
  2. Ends Against per Game: the average number of ends your opponent wins (or scores) in a game.
  3. Blank Ends per Game: the average number of blank ends your team experiences in a game.
  4. Stolen Ends for per Game: the average number of ends your team steals in a game.
  5. Stolen Ends Against per Game: the average number of ends your opponent steals in a game.

Curling Efficiencies

There are a few stats in curling related to how well your team does when they do (and don't) have the hammer, and how often you or your opponent steals an end. Each of these are calculated as percentages. These statistics are known as:

  1. Hammer Efficiency: the frequency in which your team scores two or more points with the hammer.
  2. Force Efficiency: the frequency in which your team forces your opponent to score one point when they have the hammer.
  3. Steal Efficiency: the frequency in which your team steals an end.
  4. Steal Defense Efficiency: the frequency in which your opponent steals an end.

Curling Shooting Percentage

In curling, a player's shooting percentage assesses how well a curler is making their shots. This could be over the course of a game, tournament, event, etc. The better a curler can make their shots, the higher their shooting percentage will be. If you have ever seen curling on television, you might have seen this statistic be displayed when a curler is shooting - usually it is divided into two separate percentages: one for draws and one for hits.

Curling Stats Terms

Here is a list of terms you should know related to understanding curling statistics:


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