Basketball Shot Blocking

Basketball Shot Block

Introduction

On the defensive end in basketball, shot-blocking ability from a player can be incredibly valuable. Shot blocking usually comes from taller, more physical players like centers or power forwards but anyone on the court can block a shot. TO shot block, one must knock the ball out of the hands of an offensive player before or as he is about to release the ball for a shot, layup, or putback.

Details on Shot-Blocking Value in Basketball

Teams that have power forwards or centers that can shot block and play physical sometimes intimidate offenses into staying out of the low post and paint area. Shot blocks not only get the ball out of the hands of the offense, but they can also lead to fast breaks and easy points. If someone is blocked hard this can be embarrassing and can result in a lack of confidence in their next possession.

Fast Breaks

Fast breaks are the transition from defense to offense by way of a turnover. Blocks or steals are two types of turnovers that often create fast breaks and easy points. The center or other power forward can block the ball into one of his teammate's hands to spark a fast break, which will probably end up in an easy layup or dunk.

Fearlessness of Shot Blockers

Players who block a lot of shots risk their bodies and reputations as shot blockers when they go up for a block. Some of the time these defenders can be put on what is called a poster, which means the offensive player dunks the ball over a shot blocker. The term "poster" refers to the image of this play being a good imnage to put on a poster. Their reputations as shot blockers can get diminished slightly if an offensive player dunks the ball on them.


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