Top 10 Baseball Cards

top 10 baseball cards

Baseball cards have been one of the most popular collector’s items for decades, with kids and adults alike seeking out popular and rare cards to sell or add to their collections. Of the hundreds of iterations of baseball cards that have been released over the years, there have been many that were highly sought-after, usually because they depicted popular players. Today, these cards are rare and priceless finds, and in this list, we go down the line of the ten most popular baseball cards in history.


  1. 1909-11 T206 Honus Wagner
  2. 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle
  3. 1989 Upper Deck Ken Griffey, Jr.
  4. 1909-11 T206 Ty Cobb Back
  5. 1916 M101-4 Sporting News Babe Ruth
  6. 1948 Leaf Jackie Robinson
  7. 1955 Topps Roberto Clemente
  8. 1993 Upper Deck SP Derek Jeter Foil
  9. 1948 Bowman Stan Musial
  10. 2011 Bowman Chrome Prospect Autograph Bryce Harper

1. 1909-11 T206 Honus Wagner

Maybe the most famous hobby card ever produced, the T206 Honus Wagner is undoubtedly the most sought-after baseball card. The T206 card series, created in 1909 by the American Tobacco Company, featured baseball cards slotted into cigarette packs. The T206 Wagner is so intriguing because very few prints of the card were produced. The reason for this short print (only about 60 to 200 versions) is ambiguous, but many credit it to either a dispute over using Wagner’s name and likeness without any payment or Wagner not wanting to be associated with selling tobacco products. The card is also infamous for the amount of fake and doctored copies of it that exist. Today, the T206 Wagner is more of an investment than a trading card or collector’s item, as the card, if kept in good condition, grows in price every time the card changes hands.

2. 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle

Mickey Mantle’s card in the 1952 Topps set has become one of the most recognizable baseball cards in history and currently holds the record for the highest price ever paid for a baseball card, when one was sold for an astonishing $12.6 million in 2022. Mantle is not only one of the most famous New York Yankees of all time, but he was also a cultural icon while he played in the Bronx. Surprisingly, though, his very valuable 1952 card is not from his rookie year, which occurred in 1951. Rookie cards are generally more sought-after than the other years of a player’s career, but the popularity of the 1952 Topps series sets this Mantle card apart from the 1951 Bowman rookie edition. Unlike cards such as the T206 Wagner card, this one is not nearly as hard to find. The accessibility of this card actually benefits its value, as it has made it much more famous. 

3. 1989 Upper Deck Ken Griffey, Jr.

The rookie card for the number one overall pick of the 1987 MLB Draft has become one of the most significant baseball cards of the late 20th century. The Upper Deck version of the card, featuring The Kid’s signature smile, rose above the other versions of Griffey Jr.’s rookie card produced by competitors for a couple of reasons. First, the Upper Deck packs were more expensive than other brands, so fewer people bought the packs. Also, Junior’s card was the first card in the series, which means it was at the top of the series checklist. Junior’s potential and the iconic photo made it an easy decision to have him at the top of the set. The card gained more fame as Griffey Jr. became one of the best players in the league and literally saved the Seattle Mariners from extinction.

4. 1909-11 T206 Ty Cobb Back

The second card on this list from American Tobacco Company’s legendary T206 set, Ty Cobb’s card with his name on the cigarette advertisement featured on the back of the card. The T206 set has been called “The Monster” because of the daunting task of collecting the entire set when, at the time, these cards were merely add-ons to cigarette packs and were commonly discarded. The absurd value of the red portrait Ty Cobb card comes from the text on the back that reads “Ty Cobb, King of the Smoking Tobacco World.” This card was recently in the media after seven of these ultra-rare items were found in a paper bag in an old home in 2016 and when the family found another in 2018. Coined “The Lucky 7 Find,” the discovery greatly increased the number of this specific Ty Cobb card from 15 known cards to 23.

5. 1916 M101-4 Sporting News Babe Ruth

It is no surprise that “The Great Bambino,” Babe Ruth, graces one of the most valuable baseball cards on the market. The card, printed by newspaper company “The Sporting News,” is Ruth’s rookie card, which adds even more value. Other than being a rookie card of one of the most famous baseball players ever, this card is also unique for other reasons. For example, Babe Ruth is known for his home-run-hitting ability, specifically when he predicted a home run in one at-bat, but the card was printed when Ruth still pitched. Also, the card features Ruth on the Boston Red Sox, while he is mostly known for playing for their fierce rivals, the New York Yankees. This Babe Ruth card is an important relic from a time before he revolutionized the home run and the game of baseball as a whole.

6. 1948 Leaf Jackie Robinson

As one of the most important athletes ever and a warrior who withstood horrible slurs and acts of racism, Jackie Robinson’s rookie card from the 1948 Leaf card set signaled a change in America’s pastime. While cards like the 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle and 1989 Upper Deck Ken Griffey Jr. are iconic due to their timeless photos and art of generational talents on the baseball diamond, this card speaks more to history than baseball. Of course, Robinson’s in-game legacy as one of the best hitters of the mid-20th century does not hurt the value of this card. More importantly, though, this card is a cultural artifact from one of the most important moments in baseball, a moment that changed the world of sports forever. 

7. 1955 Topps Roberto Clemente

Another example from one of Topps’s legendary series from the 1950s, the late Roberto Clemente’s rookie card still increases in value every year. Clemente’s card also signals a change in the look and aesthetic of baseball cards that Topps helped pioneer in the 1950s, with its green-to-white gradient background with both a facial photo and action shot printed on the horizontal card. With a charming and colorful background to complement all of the player’s statistics and a cartoon, the 1955 Topps series gave more personality to baseball cards. The card’s popularity was also aided by the respect fans have for Clemente following his tragic death in 1972. Clemente was a known humanitarian who constantly volunteered to help with charities and died in a plane crash heading to Nicaragua after a devastating earthquake. This event, coupled with his philanthropic and baseball legacy, has helped this card hold value for decades.

8. 1993 Upper Deck SP Derek Jeter Foil

Derek Jeter, the face of the New York Yankees’ late-1990s and early-2000s dynasty, was a staple of baseball coverage and tabloids for over a decade. Due to his widespread appeal to baseball fans and socialites, his baseball cards throughout his career were prominent pieces in fans’ collections. Because this card was printed in his rookie year, and because of other interesting qualities of this edition, the Upper Deck SP foil card is his most important baseball card feature. Its slick foil front shows an action shot of Jeter completing a play from the shortstop position, and the gold “Premier Prospects” logo in the bottom right corner, distinguishes this version of his rookie card from the others, making it more rare and lucrative. This Jeter rookie card also holds more value because of the degree of difficulty in keeping the card in mint condition. Due to the card’s foil exterior, it ages much faster and more noticeably than typical cardboard baseball cards.

9. 1948 Bowman Stan Musial

The 1948 Stan Musial “Rookie” card is one of the first post-war cards to gain value and fame. The card art is not very noteworthy, as it simply features a photo of Musial, but the context gives this card more meaning than its counterparts in the 1948 Bowman set. Due to the need for paper in wartime manufacturing, baseball cards became much rarer to find during the years of World War II. As a result, Stan Musial did not have a baseball card until his seventh season in the big leagues. This Bowman Musial card highlights how baseball card manufacturing dipped during World War II, as one of the best players in baseball–who had already established himself as a top player by winning two World Series and two Most Valuable Player Awards–did not have a card yet. The 1948 set was also revolutionary, as it established Bowman as the premier card brand to collect rookie players and prospects, a status that the company still holds to this day.

10. 2011 Bowman Chrome Prospect Autograph Bryce Harper

Bryce Harper was easily one of the most hyped baseball prospects of the 2010s. As a result, his autographed Bowman Chrome card took the collecting world by storm and immediately became one of the most expensive cards of the set. This card is significant as it shows the business side of the hobby that seems to dominate it today. Collectors look to pinpoint prospects that will have fruitful careers to later profit by selling their rare cards. Aided by the 21st century trend of autograph and memorabilia cards, this card became an immediate treasure in the marketplace. Despite the fact that Harper is still one of the most popular and skilled players in the MLB, the card’s value has fluctuated because of the high prices that auctions of the card started at in 2011. Regardless, this autographed card showcases the goals and reasons for collecting baseball cards today and how the role of these cards has changed since the early 1900s.

Honorable Mentions

1909-1911 T206 White Border Eddie Plank

After the 1909-11 T206 Honus Wagner, this card is the most sought-after card of the T206 set. It is particularly well-known for being the only card on which Eddie Plank–then a Hall of Fame pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics–can be found. Rumors suggest that a majority of these cards were destroyed as a result of a poor printing plate, which meant that they did not pass quality inspections. However, in addition to its quirks and rarity, the card is also valuable for the player it depicts. Eddie Plank, a left-handed pitcher, has long been known as one of baseball’s greatest, partly for his all-time record of 69 shutouts, the most ever by a left-handed pitcher. At the top end of mint condition, the 1909-1911 T206 White Border Eddie Plank Card is currently worth around $850,000.

1909-1911 American Caramel E90-1 Joe Jackson Rookie Card

“Shoeless” Joe Jackson is something of an American folk legend, in large part due to his role in the 1919 Black Sox World Series scandal. Jackson was considered to be one of the best players on the White Sox roster that year and also one of the best players in baseball, so his ultimate banishment from the league was of massive historical significance in the baseball world. Due to the early time-period, Joe Jackson played in and his premature departure from professional baseball, there are not very many baseball cards of his in existence. The combination of his tarnished legacy, the role he played in baseball history, and the lack of Joe Jackson cards produced back then/in circulation today make this rookie card extremely valuable amongst collectors.

1954 Topps #128 Hank Aaron Rookie Card

Hank Aaron is one of the most prominent names in baseball history, in large part due to him having broken Babe Ruth’s career home run record. Barry Bonds would go on to top Aaron’s total later in the 2000s, but many still consider Hank Aaron to be the rightful home run king due to Barry Bonds’ alleged performance-enhancing drug use. So, it comes as no surprise that “Hammerin’ Hank’s” 1954 Topps rookie card (the only universally recognized Hank Aaron rookie card in existence) is a massively popular collector’s item. As a matter of fact, a PSA 10 of this very card sold for upwards of $350,000 back in 2012.

FAQ

What types of baseball cards are worth the most money today?

Outside of a few rare rookie cards greatly appreciating in value, most of the expensive cards today are limited to a few copies and have special features that hobbyists look for. These cards have autographs or pieces of uniforms that have been worn by the player. They give collectors a special connection to the player by giving them a piece of memorabilia that not everyone can own, increasing their price and rarity.

What are the highest prices baseball cards have sold at?

The most expensive purchase of a baseball card as of today occurred in August of 2022 when a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle card sold for a whopping $12.6 million. The second-highest record is held by a 1909-11 T206 Honus Wagner card, which was also sold in August of 2022 for $7.25 million. Other notable multimillion-dollar sales of rare baseball cards have included a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle sold for $2.88 million in 2018, and a 1951 Bowman Mickey Mantle, which sold for $750,000 in the same year. These cards were all in great condition relative to other versions of the same card.

How do baseball cards hold their value?

Baseball cards hold their value based on the player’s performance and popularity in the media. Also, the condition of the card greatly influences its price. Even if a card is rare, if it has been treated poorly, the card’s value diminishes greatly. Because of the quickly-depreciating value of baseball cards, collectors generally put cards into protective sleeves as soon as they open the packs so as to not harm the card in any way.

How do I start collecting baseball cards?

Starting a baseball collection is as easy as going to your local sports goods store or an online vendor and buying packs of cards. While the most expensive cards can go for over $1 million dollars, a pack of cards is usually less than five dollars. New collectors can also use apps like Topps BUNT to collect virtual cards that come without the risk of ripping or losing your cards.